After $90K Was ‘Stolen’ from Wells Fargo Account, Man Says He’s Been Stonewalled

By: Ben Campbell | Last updated: Mar 21, 2024

An American man has been left without options after $90,000 was stolen from his Wells Fargo account, he says.

After being stonewalled by the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau, the unfortunate victim decided to post his dilemma on Reddit to see if the community could offer any help.

Firefighter Loses Nearly $100,000

One morning, an American firefighter awoke to a terrifying experience.

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A young firefighter is pictured in his gear beside a fire truck

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According to The Sun, the 21-year-old had close to $95,000 in savings stolen from his bank account.

Wells Fargo Refuses to Help

The man was forced to share his dilemma on Reddit after Wells Fargo declined to return the money to him.

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A photograph taken of a WELLS Fargo bank in Texas

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The firefighter explained he “barely makes good money as is,” and it had taken him almost six years to save up what was stolen.

Four Illicit Transactions

According to the 21-year-old, the amount was stolen via four transactions, three of which were illicit wire transfers, and the fourth was a business-to-business Automated Clearing House (ACH) withdrawal.

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A computer hacker is pictured wearing a black hoodie at his desk

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“I had over $90k, close to $95k stolen from my account,” wrote the victim.

Firefighter Reaches Out to CFPB for Help

After reviewing the clearly fraudulent transaction, the Reddit user contacted the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau (CFPB) for help resolving the claim.

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A male firefighter is pictured standing in front of a red truck

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Yet, the federal bureau didn’t fully resolve the firefighter’s issue.

CFPB Offers $25,000 in Compensation

After submitting his claim, the CFPB agreed to return approximately $25,000 to the victim.

A man is pictured speaking with a financial advisor at a white desk

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The CFPB said they could not return the total amount as they said there was a chance the firefighter had made the withdrawals himself.

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Firefighter Upset with Federal Bureau’s Decision

“When I heard this, my mind was blown,” the user wrote.

A man is visibly upset after receiving bad news

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“Why give me any of the money back then? For a multimillion-dollar company, if not billions, the security is pitiful.”

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The Bank Failed to Notify the Firefighter

According to the Reddit user, the situation is weird, as the bank failed to notify him when the large withdrawals were taking place.

A man is pictured speaking with a bank teller as he looks at his phone

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He wrote that he never received an “email, text message, notification, or even a phone call.”

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Man Files Another Claim with CFPB

The American man has since filed another claim with the CFPB.

Federal employees look over a recently submitted claim

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He hopes this time around, they will be able to reimburse him with the remaining $70,000.

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Reddit Users Offer Advice

After sharing his dilemma on Reddit, the young firefighter received a plethora of comments offering advice.

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One user said the CFPB only reimbursed the firefighter with $25,000 as that was all they could recover.

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Transactions Were Made Online

When asked how the wire transfers were made, the young man replied, “They were done ‘online,’ according to what an agent told me.”

A man is pictured wearing a dark hoodie as he types on his laptop

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“I never received a code or anything on my end,” he wrote.

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Change Online Passwords Frequently

Finally, the firefighter said, “I never use my debit card except to pay off my credit cards, as I use them for the benefits.”

A man in a white shirt is pictured using his laptop from his home office

Source: Freepik

One Reddit user offered advice, suggesting that the young firefighter change his password immediately and check his login history on the days the illicit transaction occurred.

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