Warren Buffet Claims That He Can Put an End to America’s Debt in 5 Minutes

By: Lauren Wurth | Last updated: Nov 10, 2023

Although America is one of the world’s greatest economies, it has its own share of debts. Various experts and financial gurus have continued to offer their insight over the years about methods or plans that could help get rid of the debt.

Warren Buffet is one of the financial giants to offer his two cents on the US debt margin recently. Speaking on various economic matters with Becky Quick on CNBC, the business tycoon suggested a bold policy for tackling the lingering issue of America’s debt.

Statistics Show an Increase in America’s Deficit

The United States Department of Treasury’s Fiscal Data website indicates that the country’s national deficit increased by $320 billion. This is a significant increase from the previous fiscal year.

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A graph showing the national debt of the US from 2006 to 2023

Source: Wikipedia

The government has spent $6.13 trillion, while the total revenue was $4.44 trillion in fiscal year 2023. This clearly shows that the debt margin continues to grow over time, and an effective solution is necessary at this point.

Warren Buffet Made Some Bold Claims

In the interview, Warren Buffet said, “I could end the deficit in five minutes. You just pass a law that says that anytime there is a deficit of more than 3% of GDP all sitting members of congress are ineligible for reelection.”

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Warren Buffett stares into the distance with a serious expression

Source: CTV News

The  interview dates back to 2011, but it has become relevant these days on X (previously known as Twitter) considering the rising inflation rate, debts, and a backdrop of impending elections.

Buffett Said Lawmakers Must Be Held Accountable

Warren Buffett’s plan is focused on accountability. According to him, the current members of Congress need to be encouraged and motivated to ensure that the nation’s deficit remains under 3%. Either they achieve that, or they might not be reelected.

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A sunset illuminates the Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

Source: Architect of the Capitol

The idea is that the rule will make government officials take fiscal policies more seriously, especially if they intend to get reelected.

He Also Believes Incentives Are the Way to Go

Another crucial part of Buffett’s plan is the ability to leverage on lawmakers’ incentives. By linking the possibility of reelection with a lawmaker’s ability to manage the country’s debt, they will be more motivated to be more financially responsible and to come up with sustainable strategies that significantly reduce debt.

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A pile of US dollar bills

Source: GOBankingRates

This will be a very unique approach to managing and reducing the country’s debt if it is ever considered by the government.

Experts Have Nodded and Raised Eyebrows

Many financial analysts agree that Warren Buffett’s plan is audacious and unconventional, but there are also questions and uncertainty about how practical it is.

An illustration of a group of people with question marks

Source: Pinterest

It could be an effective way to make lawmakers prioritize fiscal responsibility. However, this could cause them to ignore other important aspects such as education, social programs, and infrastructure.

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America’s Growing Debt

The country’s budget for fiscal year 2024 is $6.9 trillion dollars. This would seem like a lot of money to spend, but the current Biden administration intends to reduce the federal deficit by over $3 trillion over the next decade.

President Joe Biden giving a speech

Source: WTTW News

The budget is intended to make life easier for average Americans through assistive funding programs that could help them save money directly.

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Biden’s 2024 Budget

The current 2024 budget proposes an increase in childcare options, and it aims to reduce the costs for more than 16 million kids.

President Joe Biden speaking about the 2024 budget in Philadelphia

Source: HealthCareDrive

It also proposes an elimination of hidden rental costs in collaboration with the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), a reduction of junk fees in various aspects of the economy such as banking, internet bills, transportation, water and energy bills.

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The 2024 Budget Expands the Affordable Care Act

The existing Affordable Care Act will use expanded premium tax credits to provide an average of $800 annual premium cuts permanently. The modified act will also provide similar coverage as Medicaid in all the states yet to implement the Medicaid expansion.

A file titled Affordable Care Act, a pill bottle, and a stethoscope

Source: National Gaucher Foundation

Joe Biden doesn’t have plans as bold as Buffett’s, and while the nation’s debts grow, Americans can only hope that his administration’s 2024 budget will somehow manage to reduce the fiscal deficit.

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Is Buffett's Plan What America Needs?

Warren Buffett’s plan is truly a unique one as it seeks to link the future of Congress members to the nation’s deficit in order to permanently solve America’s debt problem.

A picture of Warren Buffett

Source: SurvivorNet

However, it remains unclear if the plan is what the nation needs, and whether it will be considered or even implemented.

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A Problem of Implementation

Regardless, the idea is an interesting one that concentrates on the importance of holding lawmakers accountable for the responsibilities bestowed on them and how to use incentives to drive results in politics.

A gavel and hammer with the US flag as the backdrop.

Source: IHLresearch

One great flaw with Buffett’s radical plan lies in its implementation. For his plan to work, it needs to become a federally recognized law.

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Buffett's Plan May Never Be Considered

The people with the power to pass such a law are the same people who could lose their seats at the table if they fall on the wrong side of it.

An aerial view of the US Congress in session

Source: Wikimedia Commons

So, would any lawmakers be willing to place their jobs on the line in an attempt to fix the country’s debt deficit?

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