Trump’s New Reality: The Rights He May Lose Following 34 Felony Convictions

By: Georgia | Published: May 31, 2024

A New York jury has found former President Donald Trump guilty of 34 felonies involving falsified payments to Stormy Daniels. 

The verdict, delivered on Thursday afternoon, jeopardizes several of Trump’s fundamental rights, including his abilities to vote and own firearms, stirring significant national attention.

Sentencing Date Set for Trump

The court has scheduled July 11 for Trump’s sentencing, a pivotal day that could reshape his future. 

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A United States of America helicopter flying over the tropical landscape of Mar-a-Lago with palm trees in the foreground

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Living in Florida as a convicted felon, Trump faces the complexities of state laws that could tightly restrict or altogether strip certain civil liberties he currently enjoys.

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Navigating Voting Rights as a Florida Felon

Residing in Florida introduces a tangled web of voting rights issues for Trump. While Florida generally strips voting rights from felons, it honors the laws of the state where the conviction occurred. 

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A "Vote Here" sign with an American flag and a directional arrow, placed on a sidewalk outside a polling station

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Thanks to New York’s rules, Trump might still vote.

Trump’s Voting Fate Hangs in Balance

Blair Bowie from the Campaign Legal Center pointed out to NBC News, Trump’s ability to vote in the upcoming elections depends entirely on his incarceration status.

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Close-up of Donald Trump speaking at a public event, his face expressive and lit by stage lights

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Bowie said, “the only way he wouldn’t be able to vote is if he is in prison on Election Day.”

Legal Opinion Suggests No Jail Time

Experts believe that Trump is unlikely to face jail time, considering his status as a non-violent first-time offender. 

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Donald Trump on stage at the CPAC event, smiling and giving a peace sign with his right hand

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This could mean that Trump remains a significant figure in public and political spheres, with his voting rights intact.

Trump's Options

Trump’s legal options include appealing any imprisonment decision. 

A supporter holding up a black T-shirt with a printed image of Donald Trump and the text "NEVER SURRENDER," behind a fence with an American flag.

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An appeal could effectively push any jail time past the presidential election, allowing him unfettered participation in what could be a highly contested election process.

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Trump Likely to Retain Voting Rights

The consensus among legal analysts is that Trump is very likely to retain his voting rights come November. 

Former President Donald Trump speaking at a podium during a rally, with supporters holding signs in the background

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The interplay of legal strategies and state law specifics regarding the voting rights of felons seems to work in his favor, keeping him an active participant in the elections.

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Potential Loss of Gun Ownership Rights

According to ATF regulations, individuals sentenced to more than a year in prison are stripped of their gun ownership rights

Close-up view of a rifle slung over a denim-wearing individual, focusing on the weapon and jeans details

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Should Trump’s sentencing exceed this limit, he would forfeit his Second Amendment rights.

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From Voting Booths to Jury Boxes

Trump is currently barred from jury duty as per Florida law, which requires felons to have their civil rights restored to serve. 

Wide-angle view of a grand courtroom with elaborate chandeliers, wooden pews, and a large mural behind the judge's bench

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Restoration is possible once all sentence terms are fulfilled, potentially enabling him to serve on a jury in the future if he wishes.

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Security Clearance Despite Convictions

If re-elected, Trump would automatically receive the highest security clearance, despite his felony status. 

Donald Trump and Melania Trump walking away from a Marine One helicopter, with a Marine guard standing at attention

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Alyssa Farah Griffin, former White House Director of Strategic Communications, described this allowance as “wild,” highlighting the unusual nature of security policies for elected officials.

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Trump Criticizes Trial as 'Rigged'

In the aftermath of his conviction, Trump fiercely criticized the proceedings, declaring the trial “rigged” and “a disgrace,” and maintaining his innocence by stating, “I am a very innocent man,” in a courthouse statement. 

Donald Trump pointing directly at the camera while speaking at a political event, his expression animated

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He accused the judge and the Manhattan District Attorney of bias and misconduct.

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Trump Sees Election Day as Ultimate Test

Despite his legal battles, Trump is gearing up for the upcoming presidential election, which he refers to as the “real verdict.” 

A group of Donald Trump supporters gathered at a rally, displaying banners and flags promoting Trump for the 2024 presidential election.

Source: Wikimedia Commons

He believes the election results will truly determine the national sentiment towards his presidency and legal troubles, maintaining his engagement in the political landscape despite his convictions.

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