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Mike Lindell’s “My Pillow” Faces Credit Woes Amid Heightened Political Attacks

Source: RSR/ MYPILLOW FACEBOOK

Mike Lindell, election conspiracy theorist and CEO of My Pillow Inc., has disclosed the major challenges his Minnesota-based pillow manufacturing company is battling. In an interview with popular podcaster Steven Bannon of War Room, Lindell revealed that his business is facing legal, financial, and political threats, which have left his employees concerned about their future at the company. 

According to the pillow magnate, who is a strong supporter of ex-president Donald Trump, his political opponents launched attacks against his company’s website and call center over worries about his election plans. “They’re very worried about our plans to secure the election,” he said, “every time they’re worried the attacks come full force at me.” Sadly, in spite of Lindell’s assurances that My Pillow is “winning every day, on all levels,” reality begs to differ.

Lindell went on Bannon’s podcast to disclose how the attacks have affected his business. In his words, “My employees come to me all the time and they’re going, you know, are things going to be OK? Are we going to be OK? And it’s concerning for them all the time and all I can say is ‘yes, we will.’” 

“I have to give my employees confidence that we’re going to be OK,” Lindell revealed, “because it just doesn’t let up … and they’re just trying to run me completely out of money so I cannot continue to fight this election.” 

This reassurance was necessary as his employees have to “sit and worry every day because of these attacks.” He stated that he was facing such huge challenges because of his determination to ensure that the country enjoys secure elections.

According to Daily Dot, My Pillow put a wide range of products (amounting to at least 850 items) up for auction in July in a bid to raise money. Items from manufacturing equipment to shipping trucks, office furniture, etc., were listed on an auction website.

To make matters worse, Walmart, Slumberland Furniture, Bed Bath & Beyond, and other major retail shops have stopped selling My Pillow products following widespread dissatisfaction over Lindell’s election conspiracies. A bank also held back a personal loan he was to receive because “they deemed it political.”

More than just My Pillow, Lindell also has personal woes to deal with. He and his company are the defendants in a $1.3 billion lawsuit from Dominion Voting Systems, the popular voting machine company. 

The election technology giant is seeking damages for the attack on its reputation as a result of Lindell’s unwarranted claims that it manipulated its machines to favor Joe Biden’s 2020 presidential election bid.

“Despite repeated warnings and efforts to share the facts with him, Mr. Lindell has continued to maliciously spread false claims about Dominion, each time giving empty assurances that he would come forward with overwhelming proof,” John Poulos, Dominion Voting Systems’ CEO, said in a statement. There have also been claims that Lindell reneged on his promise to award $5 million to whoever would prove his election console theories wrong.

Responding to Lindell’s interview with Bannon, a commenter wrote, “yeah, I’d start looking for a job ASAP.” Hopefully, Lindell’s political leanings won’t put his company’s employees out of their jobs.

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