Democrat Mayor Slammed for ‘Ridiculously’ Linking Deceased GOP Leader to July Fourth Gun Violence

By: Georgia | Published: Jul 10, 2024

Over the July 4th weekend, Chicago witnessed a harrowing surge in gun violence with 19 deaths and over 100 injuries. 

In the aftermath, Mayor Brandon Johnson pointed a finger back through decades to former President Richard Nixon, igniting a fiery debate on accountability and historical influence.

Mayor Johnson's Bold Historical Connection

“Let’s tell the full story of what happened,” Mayor Johnson urged during a press conference, suggesting that the seeds for today’s violence were sown during Nixon’s era. 

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Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson, a Black man wearing glasses and a dark suit, extends his arms wide while addressing an enthusiastic crowd from behind a transparent podium

Source: Brandon4Chicago/X

His comments have stirred controversy and criticism for connecting current city violence with past presidential policies.

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Nixon Foundation Fires Back

Responding to Johnson, the Nixon Foundation defended the former president’s record. “Richard Nixon was a champion of civil rights,” stated Jim Byron, the foundation’s president. 

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Official portrait of former President Richard Nixon, showing him seated in front of a bookshelf, dressed in a dark suit and tie

Source: Wikimedia Commons

This rebuttal highlights a clash over Nixon’s legacy and his impact on modern social issues.

Social Media Erupts in Debate

The foundation’s defense reached nearly one million views on X, formerly Twitter, showing significant public engagement. 

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A nighttime view of the Chicago skyline, illuminated against the twilight sky with reflections visible in the foreground water

Source: Wikimedia Commons

“What is happening in Chicago is heartbreaking,” Byron added, criticizing the mayor for what he called a “ridiculous” blame game.

Conservatives Critique Chicago's Leadership

Echoing Byron, conservative voices online have described Mayor Johnson’s comments as off-base. 

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Mayor Brandon Johnson, smiling in a light gray suit, claps hands with children and adults during a civic ceremony, with American flags in the background

Source: Brandon4Chicago/X

Digital strategist Greg Price shared a clip of Johnson’s remarks, sparking widespread discussion and disbelief on social media platforms.

Comedian Pokes Fun at Blame Shifting

Comedian Tim Young quipped on X, “There were 109 shootings in Chicago this past weekend, so, of course, the Mayor blames RICHARD NIXON.” 

Former President Richard Nixon at a podium with his wife and young adults, possibly his children

Source: Wikimedia Commons

His post captured the absurdity felt by many over Johnson’s historical blame.

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The Echoes of Past Policies

In defending Nixon, the foundation reminded the public of his efforts towards civil rights, including desegregating schools and supporting Black-owned businesses. 

Black and white image of former President Richard Nixon speaking into microphones held by reporters

Source: Wikimedia Commons

This paints a complex picture of Nixon’s presidency that challenges Johnson’s narrative.

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A City's Cry for Leadership

Jim Byron emphasized the need for local leadership in Chicago that “takes responsibility and works together to solve problems.” 

High-angle view of Chicago's dense skyline with numerous skyscrapers under a clear sky

Source: Fineas Anton/Unsplash

This statement aims to shift focus from historical figures to current leaders in addressing urban crises.

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Historical Impact or Political Diversion?

Critics argue that blaming historical figures diverts attention from pressing local governance issues. 

Mayor Brandon Johnson standing in a community center beside buffet servers, smiling at the camera

Source: Brandon4Chicago/X

The debate continues as both sides of the political spectrum dissect the influences that shape modern urban challenges.

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Nixon's Civil Rights Moves Highlighted

Amidst the controversy, the Nixon Foundation cited actions like an executive order promoting equal opportunity in federal agencies to illustrate Nixon’s commitment to civil rights.

Black and white photo of a significant meeting in the White House featuring a diverse group of men around a large table, including African American leaders, during a formal discussion

Source: Wikimedia Commons

This counters the negative portrayal by Mayor Johnson.

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Comedic and Critical Takes on Social Media

From comedians to commentators, social media responses ranged from sarcastic to serious.

Close-up black and white portrait of William Hale Thompson

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Stephen L. Miller noted, “The last Republican mayor of Chicago was elected in 1915,” poking fun at the historical stretch Johnson made.

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The Blame Game Continues

As the city reels from a violent weekend, the debate over historical responsibility versus present-day action remains heated. 

Mayor Brandon Johnson speaking at a podium with the text "CHICAGO DNC 2024," flanked by applauding supporters and officials in a park setting, with Chicago's skyline in the background

Source: Brandon4Chicago/X

With voices rising from all sides, the community’s urgent need for effective leadership and solutions stands out starkly against the backdrop of political rhetoric.

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